Entries with tag business .

Ideas For Engaging Large Audiences


It’s no secret that most people have a difficult time with the idea of speaking in front of large audiences. But what is less often thought of is that even those who are comfortable with public speaking likely have a difficult time commanding the attention of their peers, especially if they’re speaking to a larger audience.
So, when it comes to that big business meeting you’re speaking at, how can you be sure your audience will be engaged with you and focused on what you’re telling them instead of idly standing by?

Make what you say first and last memorable
It’s often used as a studying strategy, that is, studying for shorter periods of time more frequently. This is because the human brain remembers what is said or done at the beginning and end of a sequence better than what is done in the middle of that sequence. That’s why TV commercials often begin with a loud sound or a funny image and end with their branded logo.
So, how does this translate into helping you with your meeting? Well, barring any late walk-ins to the meeting, making the beginning and ending to your speech creative or fun is one way you can get your audience to remember you and what you were talking about.
One option is to start with something that people aren’t accustomed to like a creative ice breaker. Before anything else is said in the meeting, ask a general question. An example for a morning meeting where attendees may be groggy and tired is: “In one word, what is your morning?”. This is a short, creative question that doesn’t require much brain power for your audience to muster, and you can display their results in a unique way such as this word cloud:


Personally, I have found that concluding your speeches and meetings is a bit trickier. If you’re speaking about something that is personal to you, make sure you close it with something meaningful or emotional. This way your audience will be more inclined to listen even if it has nothing to do with themselves. If you’re speaking at an annual business conference, maybe focus on a motivational vision or idea that you have to end your speech strongly. Whatever you choose to do, do not leave any loose ends hanging. Cliffhangers are great for books and movies but detrimental to public speaking. Cliffhangers won’t make your audience want to hear more from you but will instead irritate them because your speech ended anticlimactically.

Make the meeting into an event
Don’t just have your audience sitting there listening while you say what needs to be said. This is how people start day dreaming and letting their mind wander elsewhere. Make your meeting into a discussion by using a web application that streams your audience’s live answers onto a screen. Websites like Peardeck (all you need is a Gmail account to sign in) allow admins to ask questions and then display their users’ answers live on the screen, creating a discussion or competition for their audience. By doing this, it is much more difficult for the audience’s attention to wander and much easier to see exactly who is paying attention and actively involved.

Use multiple choice questions and polls
Let your audience test their knowledge of the company or whatever subject you’re speaking about by asking questions with definitive answers. By asking a series of questions, you can hammer home key points (like the actual reason sales are up) and your individual audience members can have a competition between each other to see who can answer the most questions correctly.
By polling your audience, you can ask key questions about almost anything without receiving an awkward silence from the crowd. Often speakers ask for a single answer and receive crickets in response for one of four reasons: 1) the audience isn’t sure if it was a rhetorical question, 2) the audience believes the speaker wants them to all to agree on a single, unified answer, 3) no one in the audience wants to offer up their own answer for risk of being wrong in front of countless people, or 4) the audience is just plainly not paying attention. Polling the audience as a whole negates all of these potential problems for the speaker and keeps the meeting light and efficient.

Whatever you decide to do to spice up your next business meeting, conference, or big toast at a party, remember to make it engaging, use pictures and graphics if the topic calls for it, and make it stand out from those in the past. Use some of the ideas above or come up with your own ways to form a more productive meeting or a more encapsulating speech. Just remember that you don’t need to make it the greatest speech ever spoken or the best meeting ever planned; just make it memorable and give it an attention-grabbing beginning and a strong closing!

Ideas for this blog were inspired by: http://www.polleverywhere.com/blog/all-hands-meeting-ideas/
Picture credit: http://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/53/00-Blog_Thinkstock_Images/Science_Backed_Tips_for_Public_Speaking.jpg
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/62/78/e6/6278e6ffcfce493b1393dd37af6f5386.jpg

Defining Dress Codes

With so many different dress codes out there, it can be difficult to know what to wear, even when the type of dress requested is stated on the invitation. Even then, there are so many variations to requested attires that this topic naturally lends itself to an answer of, “It depends…”. But If we can help you here, even a tiny bit, we’re going to go for it!


Smart Casual
Women: Wear a pencil skirt or dress pants, paired with a silk or button-down top and high heels.
Men: Opt for dressy trousers, paired with a collared shirt and loafers.
Typical places to wear Smart Casual: Office parties, happy hours, or a business luncheon.



“Dressy” Casual
Women: Avoid wearing denim, tennis shoes, and cotton tees. Instead, opt for silk pants, dress pants, or a skirt. Pair with a patent leather flat, or one with nice embellishments such as a bow, buckle, or a print.
Men: Wear trousers and a dress shirt with leather loafers, oxfords, or a slip-on shoe. Pair with a blazer or sport coat. Avoid showing up with wrinkles or clothes one size too big, too small, or in a non-coordinating color. A tie is optional.
Typical places to wear “Dressy” Casual: Church/Temple, dinner, or an invite received via phone or e-mail.


Country Club Casual
Women: Choose an open-necked or polo shirt. You can also go with dresses and skirts with minimal accessories.
Men: Wear an open-necked or polo shirt, paired with khakis. Accessorize with leather shoes and a belt.
Typical places to wear Country Club Casual: The country club (obviously), a friend’s home for dinner, or a nice restaurant.


Business Casual
Women: A skirt, khakis, or dress pants paired with long sleeve or three-quarter sleeve tops. A casual dress and flats are options as well.
Men: Wear a button-down or a polo shirt, paired with khakis, or dress pants. If you so desire, layer with a V-neck sweater, a blazer, or a sport coat. A tie is optional.
Typical places to wear Business Casual: A company party, daily work attire (depending on your job), or business lunch meetings.


Cocktail Attire
Women: Wear a shorter dress with some frill. The classic little black dress makes for great cocktail attire, and is the easiest to show your personality by accessorizing to suit your mood.
Men: Wear a dark suit, coat, and tie. Opting for dark jeans paired with a jacket and tie is also acceptable at some cocktail events, depending on how casual the atmosphere is.
Typical places to wear Cocktail Attire: Adult birthday parties and evening social events.


Lounge Attire
Women: Wear a dress that would be appropriate for brunch or afternoon tea. It should fall to, or slightly above, the knee, and not be too sparkly or low-cut. Incorporate a jacket or shawl to cover the arms.
Men: Opt for a dark suit paired with a crisp, white shirt. You can go with or without a tie. Opting for a vest instead of a tie adds informality of the look.
Typical places to wear Lounge Attire: Daytime engagement parties, business breakfasts, and afternoon tea.


White Tie
Women: A floor-length ball gown is a must. Accessorize with opera length gloves, glamorous jewels, and up-do hairstyles.
Men: Wear a short or waist length black tailcoat (tails should reach the back of your knees,) white bow tie, starched white shirt, and a cummerbund (optional). Sport high-quality black pants.
Typical places to wear White Tie: Charity fundraisers, government ceremonies, weddings, and the opera.


Black Tie
Women: Gussy up in a floor-length ball gown. A very dressy cocktail dress may be acceptable depending on the venue of the event.
Men: Wear a dark suit or a tuxedo without tails. Pair with a white shirt and a tie, or a bow tie with or without a vest and a cummerbund.
Typical places to wear Black Tie: Charity fundraisers, political dinner parties, and weddings.


“Creative” Black Tie
Women: Dress up in a long gown, cocktail dress, or snazzy separates. Accessorize with the latest trends, such as feathers, sequins, sheer fabrics, and capes. Show off your personality with every detail.
Men: Incorporate trendy prints in with your tie and a dressy shirt. Mix fabrics such as a silk blazer and a dress shirt to create a formal—yet interesting—look.
Typical places to wear “Creative” Black Tie: Galas, silent auctions, weddings, and formal dinners that have a fun atmosphere.


“Warm Weather” Black Tie
Women: Wear a long gown with white gloves (optional) and minimal jewelry.
Men: Wear a white dinner jacket, in a worsted wool, gabardine, linen, or cotton fabric material. Pair this with a white dress shirt, bow tie, a cummerbund, and nice black leather shoes.
Typical places to wear “Warm Weather” Black Tie: Formal events that are held outdoors, such as a cruise line or country club dinners, weddings, and galas.


Black Tie Optional
Women: Look glamorous in a long gown, cocktail dress, or luxurious separates. Accessorize with items such as long gloves, clutches, and jewelry to top off the whole look.
Men: If you own a tuxedo, wear it. If not, wear a suit in a dark color such as charcoal or black, paired with a white dress shirt, and a solid colored tie. Make sure patterns are kept to a minimum and shoes are shined. Accessorize your look with a pocket square and cuff links.
Typical places to wear Black Tie Optional: Elegant events such as galas, silent auctions, weddings, formal dinners.



Blog credit: https://www.artinstitutes.edu/about/blog/defining-dress-codes-what-to-wear-for-every-occasion